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Suffol Horse Breed

Exterior
Their bones are provided with clean, dense bones. Suffolk legs corresponding to their extreme massiveness seem short, with heavily muscled forearms and thighs; there are no thick brushes on the legs, like other heavy trucks. Their excellent hooves are round, of medium size, strong enough – even in the unworn state they wear out a little. Suffolks have large heads with mobile ears; powerful curved neck. Shoulders tend to be straightforward, which corresponds to strength rather than speed. The back is short and strong. An adult horse can weigh from 700 kg to a whole ton. It seems that the body is too big for the legs, which gave the breed the nickname “Suffolk Punch”

Height at withers: Average height is 165 cm at the withers, but many stallions reach 174 cm and above.
Dress: Always “chestnut” suit (traditional writing without the letter “t” should be noted), often accompanied by an asterisk, or a thin groove. Other suits are not observed. There are seven recognized chestnut habits: dark to brown, red-brown, light to powdery, red, golden, lemon, light to brown, dull to powdery
Features
Magnificent character and docile temperament. They are diligent in their work, very hardy and have a big “heart”. The suit they have chestnut, includes shades from light golden to dark brown. White markings come across, but mostly not as often as in other breeds, most of them are limited to an asterisk or small socks. For registration in the tribal book no other suit, except chestnut, is allowed. This charm of suffolves is successfully reflected in the words of the writer Margaret Henry: “Their color is light chestnut — like flames against the background of black field furrows of the plowed land, against the background of green corn, against the background of a blue horizon.”
The breed is famous for its calm temper, and young horses can be quickly trained to perform any work. Due to its precocity, many suffolks can be used for light work as early as two years of age, and in three years they are able to work in full force, fully working until the age of twenty. For breed characteristic simplicity to the conditions of detention. Taking into account the weight and work done, their feed consumption is small. Suffolk can live on a diet that kept on fasting rations of the huge work horses of Liverpool and London.

Origin
The most famous heavy breeds of modern times go back to the “Great fighting” horses of the Middle Ages. But while these great giants clashed with each other in mortal battles, the peaceful farmers of eastern England developed their own breed of heavy horses, the suffolk pancha.
Norfolk and Suffolk counties in England became the homeland of the suffolk horses. In the north, east and south, they bordered on the North Sea, and in the west with Fenes. Isolated from their neighbors, the farmers of Suffolk, regardless of the farmers of other lands, cultivated livestock suitable for their way of life. Plowing on heavy clay soils required from the workhorse not only strength, but also endurance, health, longevity and tranquility. So these diligent tillers brought the Suffolk horse and selected in it qualities that fully met their needs.
Suffolk farmers used their horses to farm and harvest their land, and rarely sold them. This left the suffolk not only relatively unknown, but purebred, they remained intact and devoted to their original purpose – to be strong and loyal employees of their masters. Breed was used mainly for agricultural work.
According to Camden’s Britannia, the first mention of the Suffolk horse, originating from Suffolk and the neighboring counties of East Anglia, dates back to 1506. This means that the suffolks are the oldest heavy breed of Britain, which has now existed in a state that has not changed since those times. Each suffolk existing today goes back in a straight male line to a horse, born in 1768, the horse of Thomas Krips from Ufford. At the same time, all the other male lines arose and died. At the beginning of the 19th century and the 1940s. – during the peak of their popularity – East Anglia was isolated from the rest of Britain, and thus the breed did not leave its homeland until the 1930s. The early mechanization of agriculture, ideal for the farmlands of eastern England, led to a dramatic decline in the number of suffolk stock. In 1966 only 9 foals were born, the breed seemed to be facing extinction. Fortunately, new breeders helped save the breed, and since then the stock has started to grow slowly. In October 1999 A census of the Suffolk Horse Society showed that the breed consists of 25 registered stallions and 96 mares (4 years old and older), 30 young mares (3 years old and older) and 50 geldings. The population thus amounted to 201 head.

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