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Bridle play
All my horses are drawn to the bridle when I saddle them. The way a horse takes a bridle and snaffle can tell a lot about its attitude to work.…

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We teach the horse to pass through narrow spaces.

The exercise I want to talk about will help you guide your horse to pass through narrow spaces without moving from its place. Horses are claustrophobic in nature and when they are turned on or sent to a narrow space, they can start to panic. The “sending out” exercise will become a convenient tool that will help your horse overcome the fear of narrow spaces, as well as other “creepy” objects. With the help of this exercise, I teach horses to get into a horse transport. This exercise will also come in handy if your horse resists and struggles with a halter that puts pressure on the area behind the ears, prompting it to lower its head.

You can start learning using a fence or fence. Give the horse confidence, starting at a distance of about 4.5-6 meters from the fence. Face him. The horse should stand “face” to your shoulder.

Hold the tomber at a distance of 12 meters from the carabiner so that the knuckles are on top. Hold the whip in your other hand as if you were shaking someone’s hand. If you send a horse from right to left, you need to hold a turbo in your left hand and a whip in your right.

Ask the horse to pass between you and the fence, pointing with the hand in which the chombur is located, up high in the direction in which you want the horse to enter your improvised corridor. You need to work through the halter. Ideally, the horse should give way to the pressure of the halter and go forward immediately. If she does not do this, use the whip — lift him up and tap the air rhythmically against the horse’s neck to create pressure and induce her to go forward. One two three four. If the horse has not gone forward, start to touch it with the whip. One two three four. If the horse is still standing in front of you, touch its head and neck to make it slip in front of the fence. Once she is facing the fence, touch the area of ​​the cinch to create a forward movement. Keep pushing rhythmically, increasing the pressure on every fourth count until the horse moves forward.

As the horse moves forward, immediately relieve the pressure by lowering the whip to a neutral position along its body. Continue pointing with a scomber to guide the horse forward.

As soon as the horse’s tail passes in front of you, lower the hand with the rope to the navel. Then go to the horse’s tail and swing the whip so that the horse moves the hind limbs to the side. Always take a step with your foot on the same side of your body as the whip. This will cause the horse to move its hind limbs away from you, so it will turn and look at you with two eyes. If the horse does not remove the backside when you swing the whip, you can touch it.

When a horse deals with this exercise, you will no longer have to use a whip, because as soon as you look at her backside, she will remove it and face you. But at the beginning, if you step towards the horse’s hips, creating more pressure energy with a whip, it will be easier for the horse to understand what you are asking for.

Change the roles of your hands by shifting the whip and the chombur into the opposite hands (the whip needs to be held under the chombur). Then point upward with the chombour hand to ask the horse to return to the fence. If she doesn’t move, touch her with the whip. First touch the air – one, two, three, four – rhythmically. If the horse does not move, touch it – one, two, three, four. Rhythmically increase the pressure until the horse moves the legs forward. As soon as she does, immediately remove the pressure of the whip and lower it to the ground. The only time you don’t increase your pressure is when the horse feels uncomfortable. Just keep applying the same pressure until she gives the right answer.

When the horse’s tail passes by you, move the hand holding the tombour to the navel, and then take a step towards the tail. Simultaneously swing the whip to ask the horse to remove the butt.

Gradually reduce the distance between yourself and the fence until you are just 1.2 meters away. Try not to make a long pause between each approach when you send a horse through the “corridor”. You need her to pass between the fence and you, put her ass away and immediately go back to the other side.

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