Vladimir heavy-duty horse breed
The Vladimir breed was registered in 1946. It was created during the work of the Gavrilovo-Posad breeding horse breeding center. The Vladimir heavy breed was bred as a result of…

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We teach the horse to pass through narrow spaces.
The exercise I want to talk about will help you guide your horse to pass through narrow spaces without moving from its place. Horses are claustrophobic in nature and when…

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Activate your horse's “engine”
Activate your horse's “engine” Many coaches say that the horse's back should be "active." But what is this "activity" and how to achieve it? What activity can be considered correct,…

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American Cream (Harness) Horse Breed

American Creme is the only breed of heavyweight bred in the United States.
On the exterior of the horse of this breed are similar to the average in terms of heavy draft. They have a medium-sized head with a wide forehead and small pointed ears, expressive eyes of characteristic amber color, short, well-set neck, rather short body, strong back, strong legs with small, neat hooves.

The ideal American cream is a gold suit with a white mane and tail, pink skin with dark speckles and amber eyes. Several white markings are highly desirable. Pink skin is a decisive factor in maintaining a bright cream color. dark-skinned cream horses often do not have a coloring that satisfies the characteristics of the breed
With further mating with other cream ones, they usually give off too light or almost light gray descendants. Amber eyes are an unusual and distinctive feature of American cream. Newborn foals have almost white eyes, and after a while they begin to darken and in adult horses have an amber color.

The breed is descended from a heavy mare with an original cream color. Old Granny is the first known American cream truck, she appeared at auction in Storey County, Iowa, in 1911. She was born approximately between 1900 and 1905. Although its origin is not fully known, its ancestors are traced in its pedigree – heavy trucks. She was bought by a famous cattle trader, Harry Lakin, and brought several cream-colored foals on his farm.
All of them were sold at prices above average. Eric Christian, a veterinarian practicing in that area, was amazed at the beauty of her foals, persuaded the Nelson brothers to leave one of her descendants as a producer and try to create a new breed of horses with a bright golden color, white mane and tail and amber-colored eyes. Nelson’s Buck is considered the founder of this breed. This first known stallion from the Old Glenni, appeared in the spring of 1920. Although his father was the black Percheron, he had the same wonderful cream “shirt” as his mother, Old Woman Glenny. Several cream foals were obtained from him, but only Yancy, a cream foal from a black Percheron mare, born in 1926, was his only registered descendant. Yancy became the father of Knox the 1st, who was born from a bay mare of the Shire breed in 1926.

Knox 1st was the father of the most powerful stallion in the breed, Silver Lace. Silver Leys – the son of Knox, the 1st and light-bay Belgian mare, was born in 1931. He had a narrow groove, he reached the height of his withers 16 palms (163 cm). It was bred and grown by G.A. Lenning, Union, Hardin County, Iowa. Like many farmers at the time, Lenning lost a lot during the Great Depression, he had only a few cows and four horses. One of these horses was Silver Lace.

At the beginning, the stallion was named King. But Lenning’s son wanted to rename the horse. Lenning combined the word “Silver” with the name of the farm, so King became Silver Lasse. The stallion was used in the mating from early spring to the end of November. The price for the mating with him was $ 15. The money received for the mating with Silver Lace helped the Lenning family very much during the Depression. Silver Leys for 7 years became the father of several foals. In 1939, 6 months after the proposal to sell it for $ 1000 was rejected, the stallion unexpectedly fell. T. Rierson from Hardin County, Iowa, became interested in these attractive new horses and began to buy all the good cream foals from Silver Lace that he could only find.

With the help of horse owners, he carefully recorded the origin of each animal. Ryerson became the founder of the Association of American Cream Horses. Thanks to his perseverance, in Iowa on July 11, 1944. pact was issued, numbering 20 members of the association. This was the culmination of almost 40 years of creation of a new breed of heavy-duty trucks of American origin. In 1944 Ryerson writes, “Now I have 16 heads of these horses, and five are sold to new breeders since we established our organization. All these horses go back to our old cream mare, which came to our area 30 years ago.

Earn the respect of your horse
Respect for the horse can not be achieved "automatically", it does not come from nowhere. It must be earned. The best way to do this is to use the same…

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The crisis of the genre - how to regain confidence?
“It would be better if I knitted or went to cooking classes!” - who in our hearts did not say anything like that after an unsuccessful riding lesson. This reaction…

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The crisis of the genre - how to regain confidence?
“It would be better if I knitted or went to cooking classes!” - who in our hearts did not say anything like that after an unsuccessful riding lesson. This reaction…

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How to "wake up" a lazy horse
Most likely you do not need to explain what a lazy horse is. These can often be seen in the arena. As a rule, such horses are not very worried…

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